Category Archives: Clean, Maintain & Repair

Mold, Mice & Rats in Weber Gas Grills

Mold inside Weber grill

You’ve got your steaks seasoned and ready for the grill. You go out to the patio, remove the grill cover, and open the lid.

What greets you is a colony of fuzzy white/green mold on the grates and certain areas of the firebox. Or worse, a fuzzy creature of a different sort, the kind with eyes and nose and whiskers and tail, that’s sitting on the Flavorizer bars, staring up at you through the cooking grates, just as surprised to see you as you are to see him.

Put those steaks back in the refrigerator. You’ve got work to do before you’ll be ready to cook.

Dead mouse in Weber gas grill

It’s no fun to find mold or a live or dead critter in your grill, but it happens. I’ve discovered a live rat making its home inside the cookbox of my gas grill, with feces and urine and footprints all over the exterior of the grill. Gross, for sure, but no reason to throw your grill to the curb.

Both mold and critters thrive on the grease and bits of leftover food found in a dirty grill. For mice and rats, it’s also about building a safe, cozy home within the confines of your grill.

So what should you do to put your grill back into service? And how do you prevent it from happening again in the future?

Read on to find out.

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Replacing Weber Gas Grill Igniters

Introduction

Pushing igniter button

It’s common to hear someone say that their old Weber gas grill is still going strong, but it doesn’t light properly. They have to light it with a match through the manual lighting hole in the front of the grill.

Sadly, it’s also common for some grill owners to think it’s time to toss and replace an old grill when it won’t light.

Difficulty in lighting is a common problem as a gas grill gets older. The solution is to install a new igniter kit. Doing so is cheap and easy on older Weber grills and just slightly more expensive and difficult on more recent Weber grills. Either way, it’s cheaper than buying a new grill and it’s a job that I’m confident you can do…so read on!

Buying The Correct Igniter Kit Is Key

Electronic igniter kit vs mechanical igniter kit
Electronic igniter kit (left) vs. mechanical igniter kit (right)

Weber has used a variety of igniter kits over the years for different grills. Some kits are mechanical, some are electronic. Some include multiple igniters, some include just one. The wires may be longer in some kits and shorter in others. It’s important to get the right kit for your grill because even kits that look alike may not work properly in your specific grill.

Weber does not list the replacement igniter kit part number in your grill’s owners manual because these part numbers may change over time. The best way to make sure you get the right kit is to call Weber Customer Support at 800-446-0171. Give them your grill’s model name and serial number and they’ll tell you which part number you need. Alternatively, if you’re buying at a home center or online, read the box label or product description carefully to make sure the kit covers your specific grill model and year.

Types of Ignition Systems

Prior to the mid-2000s, Weber used a mechanical piezo ignition system in gas grills. When you depress the ignition button, a spring-loaded hammer hits a crystal, generating a high voltage discharge that travels through wires to a ceramic igniter in the firebox, creating a spark next to the burner tube and lighting the gas. These older systems make a loud metallic “bang” noise when you depress the rectangular ignition button. Each time you depress the button, a spark is generated. Continue reading Replacing Weber Gas Grill Igniters

Cleaning Cast Iron Griddles & Skillets

Smashing a burger

Sometimes I like to use a cast iron griddle or skillet in my Weber gas grill. I use a griddle to make smashed burgers or to do a reverse sear on a steak.  I’ve used a CI skillet on the grill to fry extra-thick bacon and pork belly to avoid setting off the smoke detector in the house! Both are great tools that you should try sometime on your gas grill.

Cleaning Cast Iron

When it comes to cleaning a cast iron griddle or skillet, it’s really not that hard. Just follow these easy steps. Continue reading Cleaning Cast Iron Griddles & Skillets

Cleaning & Lubricating Weber Gas Grill Valves

Are the gas grill valves in your old Weber Genesis or Summit grill stiff and hard to turn? Do they no longer lock in the Off/High/Medium/Low positions? Do they not pop back up after being pushed down?

If you answered “Yes” to any of these questions, you can probably solve the problem by cleaning and lubricating the gas valves.

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Genesis Platinum C Cleanup & Repair by Scott P

To the untrained eye, this circa 2005 Weber Genesis Platinum C gas grill looks like a piece of junk, ready for the scrap heap. But Scott P. from Porter, TX knew better. He picked it up on Craigslist for $50, gave it some spit and polish, and it’s ready for many more years of grilling.

Genesis Platinum C as purchased by Scott P.
Genesis Platinum C as purchased by Scott P.
Rusted floorpan in storage enclosure
Rusted floor pan in storage enclosure

Scott gave the grill a thorough cleaning inside and out, then removed the storage enclosure and did some repair to the floor pan using a rust converter, bonding primer, and graphite spray paint.

Genesis Platinum C post-rehab
Genesis Platinum C post-rehab

A little more polishing of the stainless steel and gray painted surfaces and this gasser was ready for action!

“The burners all work well. It got up to 500°F in about 6 minutes and 600°F a bit later,” says Scott. “I could have spent more time sanding and grinding to smooth out the rust and old paint, but I was looking to do this quick.”

What Scott calls “quick” I call “looks great”!

You can read more about this Weber Genesis Platinum C clean-up and repair on The Virtual Weber Bulletin Board.

Repair Rusted Screw Holes With QuikSteel

It’s not uncommon to encounter a rusted-out screw hole when restoring an old Weber gas grill. How do you repair a rusted-out screw hole? In some cases, it’s easy enough to clean-out whatever remains of the hole and replace the original screw with a bolt and nut. But in some cases, you’ll want (or need) to repair the screw hole so the original screw can be used again.

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Spider Screens: Inspection & Cleaning

Did you know that your Weber gas grill contains spider screens? Did you know that you need to occasionally inspect and clean them? If you didn’t know these two facts, read on.

When the performance of your Weber gas grill seems to be lacking—for example, it’s not achieving the high temps it used to—the first thing you should check is the condition of the burner tubes. If the tubes are covered with cooking debris and scale and the flame pattern is more yellow than blue, the burner tubes need to be cleaned.

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