Category Archives: Restore

Cleaning & Lubricating Weber Gas Grill Valves

Are the gas grill valves in your old Weber Genesis or Summit grill stiff and hard to turn? Do they no longer lock in the Off/High/Medium/Low positions? Do they not pop back up after being pushed down?

If you answered “Yes” to any of these questions, you can probably solve the problem by cleaning and lubricating the gas valves.

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Genesis Platinum C Cleanup & Repair by Scott P

To the untrained eye, this circa 2005 Weber Genesis Platinum C gas grill looks like a piece of junk, ready for the scrap heap. But Scott P. from Porter, TX knew better. He picked it up on Craigslist for $50, gave it some spit and polish, and it’s ready for many more years of grilling.

Genesis Platinum C as purchased by Scott P.
Genesis Platinum C as purchased by Scott P.
Rusted floorpan in storage enclosure
Rusted floor pan in storage enclosure

Scott gave the grill a thorough cleaning inside and out, then removed the storage enclosure and did some repair to the floor pan using a rust converter, bonding primer, and graphite spray paint.

Genesis Platinum C post-rehab
Genesis Platinum C post-rehab

A little more polishing of the stainless steel and gray painted surfaces and this gasser was ready for action!

“The burners all work well. It got up to 500°F in about 6 minutes and 600°F a bit later,” says Scott. “I could have spent more time sanding and grinding to smooth out the rust and old paint, but I was looking to do this quick.”

What Scott calls “quick” I call “looks great”!

You can read more about this Weber Genesis Platinum C clean-up and repair on The Virtual Weber Bulletin Board.

Repair Rusted Screw Holes With QuikSteel

It’s not uncommon to encounter a rusted-out screw hole when restoring an old Weber gas grill. How do you repair a rusted-out screw hole? In some cases, it’s easy enough to clean-out whatever remains of the hole and replace the original screw with a bolt and nut. But in some cases, you’ll want (or need) to repair the screw hole so the original screw can be used again.

Continue reading Repair Rusted Screw Holes With QuikSteel

Genesis 2 Restoration by EdW

Here’s a beautiful restoration of a Weber Genesis 2 by EdW from Silver Spring, MD. He’s documented the process in a series of posts on The Virtual Weber Bulletin Board.

Genesis 2 after restoration and before restoration
Genesis 2 after & before restoration

The restoration included a complete disassembly of the grill, repair of the rusted frame, replacements of many internal parts, repainting of the frame/firebox/lid end caps, and some beautiful new woodwork on the work surfaces.

Area of rust cut-off and rewelded
Area of rust cut-off and rewelded
Replacement piece welded into frame
Replacement piece welded into frame
Repainting firebox
Repainting firebox
Replacing burner tubes
Replacing burner tubes

EdW utilized much of the information found on this blog and in the Weber Gas Grills forum at The Virtual Weber Bulletin Board to complete his restoration, including how to restore the Weber emblem and how to clean the porcelain coated lid.

You can read more about this restoration on The Virtual Weber Bulletin Board.

Genesis Silver B Restoration by THyde

THyde from Bethlehem, PA has documented his impressive restoration of this burgundy Genesis Silver B in a series of posts on The Virtual Weber Bulletin Board.

Weber Genesis Silver B before restoration
Weber Genesis Silver B before restoration

The cooking grates had been recently replaced by the previous owner and the Flavorizer bars were in pretty good shape, but there were plenty of issues with broken bolts and rust on the frame that needed to be addressed.

Rust on the frame
Rust on the frame

THyde also replaced the burners, ignition system, and control knobs. And of course, there was lots of cleaning and cosmetic work to be done to make this beauty shine like new again.

Weber Genesis Silver B after restoration
Weber Genesis Silver B after restoration

You can read more about this restoration on The Virtual Weber Bulletin Board.

Genesis 1100 Redhead Restoration by KellyMc

TVWBB member KellyMc from Austin, Texas picked up this 1998 Weber Genesis 1100 redhead on Craigslist for just $45.

“I spent about $160 on paint, wood and finishes, warming basket and shelf, catch pan and holder, cover and a propane tank,” says Kelly. “I’ve used it half a dozen times already and it works great. I like it so much better than something new that would have cost twice as much or would have been half as well-made.”

Weber Genesis 1100 redhead before restoration
Weber Genesis 1100 redhead before restoration
Weber Genesis 1100 redhead after restoration
Weber Genesis 1100 redhead after restoration

What really stands out about Kelly’s restoration is the woodwork. “I used cedar from Home Depot — 1x2s for the side shelf and just plain fence pickets for the bottom shelf. The handle is the original wood, which seems like very cheap pine, with the gray paint sanded off.

“I sanded everything thoroughly and did 3 or 4 coats of teak oil. Then I sanded again and topped with spray-on spar varnish. I think I did 2 or 3 coats, sanding between each. It looks quite nice and seems plenty water-resistant. I keep it completely covered between uses, so I’m hoping it stays looking great for a long time.”

You can read more about this restoration, with lots of photos, on The Virtual Weber Bulletin Board.

Cleaning Inside The Firebox

A couple of weeks ago we discussed repainting the outside of the firebox to restore it like new. It’s also possible to clean the inside of the firebox as part of a restoration project.

Assuming that you give your grill a thorough cleaning once or twice a year, there’s little you need to do to maintain the inside of your gas grill firebox. Just brush any loose material with a stiff bristle brush or scrape it with a putty knife and you’re good to go. But if you’re restoring an old, abused grill, you might want to do a deep cleaning.

Enter an angle grinder and a cup wire brush. That’s what TVWBB member AnthonyJ used when restoring the Weber Genesis Silver C shown in these photos.

Anthony removed all the parts inside the firebox and removed the firebox from the frame before cleaning the interior with that powerful wire brush.
Anthony removed all the parts inside the firebox and removed the firebox from the frame before cleaning the interior with that powerful wire brush.
This photo shows the firebox back on the grill frame, with burner tubes, igniters, and stainless steel Flavorizer bars going back into the firebox.
This photo shows the firebox back on the grill frame, with burner tubes, igniters, and stainless steel Flavorizer bars going back into the firebox.
New stainless steel grill grates complete the restoration.
New stainless steel grill grates complete the restoration.
All internal parts installed.
All internal parts installed.
Weber Genesis Silver C ready to go back into service for years to come.
Weber Genesis Silver C ready to go back into service for years to come.

Anthony spent $60 buying this grill and then replaced the following parts during the restoration:

  • Flavorizer bars
  • Burner tubes
  • Cooking grates
  • Caster wheels
  • Igniters
  • Misc screws
  • Plastic Hinge for the side burner cover

You can read more about Anthony’s restoration on The Virtual Weber Bulletin Board.

Repainting The Firebox

Weber gas grills are notorious for flaking, peeling paint on the firebox. The gas grill warranty covers the paint for two years, which is about how long it takes to start flaking and peeling on your grill! But to be fair, the firebox does get very hot and paint is no match for those high temperatures.

So what to do? You repaint the exterior surface yourself. You do not repaint the interior. The process is pretty straight-forward.

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Start by using a wire brush to remove any loose paint. Hit the flaky spots with fine-grit sandpaper to make them ready for painting.

You don’t have to remove the firebox as shown here…this is part of a full-blown restoration. You can simply mask-off the surrounding surfaces with newspaper and masking tape and paint in place.

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Use flat black high-temp spray paint to repaint the firebox. Two thin coats of paint is usually better than one thick coat.

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Depending on your particular grill, you can even repaint the lid end caps using the same process.

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The results are pretty satisfying. A fresh coat of black paint will make your Weber gas grill look good as new. Just remember to save that leftover spray paint…because you’ll be repainting again two years from now.

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These photos are from a 1992 Genesis 1000 restoration by Bob U. You can see more photos of this restoration on The Virtual Weber Bulletin Board.